Mahatma, Episode 4: Discipline

A Film By India Public Televison Discipline in thought, word and deed, was a basic tenet of Gandhiji’s teaching and of his own life. H is concept of freedom itself meant Swaraj, or ’self-rule”, as he considered that “man is a self-governing being”. Discipline was an essential ingredient of non-violent conduct. Even when being in […]

A Film By

India Public Televison

Discipline in thought, word and deed, was a basic tenet of Gandhiji’s teaching and of his own life. H is concept of freedom itself meant Swaraj, or ’self-rule”, as he considered that “man is a self-governing being”. Discipline was an essential ingredient of non-violent conduct. Even when being in prison, he would insist that he and his fellow satyagrahis behaved as ideal and disciplined prisoners, and put their whole self to the work allotted to them.

Gandhiji stated that “The highest form of freedom carried with it the greatest measure of discipline and humility”, and, “Democracy disciplined and enlightened is the finest thing in the world.” He also considered that “Mass discipline is an essential condition for people who aspire to be a great nation.” He was a strict disciplinarian for observance of even ordinary rules of the Ashrams in which he lived. He always insisted on punctuality and would not countenance wastage of even a minute of time.

On October 11, 1906, Mahatma Gandhi had first propounded his philosophy and technique of Satyagraha (“holding on to Truth”) in his address to the 3,000 Indians assembled at Johannesburg in South Africa to protest against the “Black” Ordinance, which sought to severely curtail their rights as citizens. The year 2006-07 marks the centenary of the birth of Gandhiji’s Satyagraha.

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